Five New Tool Aprons–One New Market


Just listed 5 new pieces in my Etsy shop. And here they are:

Blue Hankie and Pink Seersucker

Blue Hankie and Pink Seersucker

Best Hankie Find EVER!

Best Hankie Find EVER!

Flowerpot Apron Pocket meets Barkcloth and 60s Print

Flowerpot Apron Pocket meets Barkcloth and 60s Print

Old meets New with Veg in Pink

Old meets New with Veg in Pink

More Barkcloth with Vintage Plant Patches.

More Barkcloth with Vintage Plant Patches.

Blue, Brown, Gold, Orange with Appliqued leaves.

Blue, Brown, Gold, Orange with Appliqued leaves.

What to check these pieces out in person? Come to the newly revamped Apex Farmers Market next Saturday, July 23. It’s Christmas in July–so there should be several craft vendors, along with great fruits, veg, flowers, baked goods and cheeses.

This morning I bought okra, tomatoes, tiny little cukes, eggs and blue berries. Delicious, farm fresh and this up and coming market is right down the street from where I live. Check it out!

No More Crooked Patch Pockets–A Technique Learned from Reclaimed Jeans


pocket1

It’s easy to pin patch pockets on straight–but sewing them on straight is another matter. That’s because the machine presser foot PRESSES the fabric in one direction. If you start out on one pocket corner and sew to the other (the way I was taught) you often end up noticeably higher on the second corner.

pocket6

Not your fault–but that doesn’t lessen the FRUSTRATION factor.

IMG_9478

So work with pockets a lot. My passion is making heavy duty, vintage fabric tool aprons for women. A reclaimed denim patch pocket is almost always part of the design. After ripping many of these off to straighten them–I stumbled on a better way–change your starting point when sewing on a pocket.

Begin stitching at center bottom and sew toward one corner.

pocket2

The seam indentations on jeans make this easy. On regular fabric use your presser foot as a seam guide.

pocket3

Sew to the top edge. Pivot and take a few stitched between the seam lines (I like to back stitch here for extra strength). Pivot and sew down (making two rows of stitching).

Repeat at the other corner. Stitch down to the center again and you’re done.

pocket4

Works ever time on all fabrics with just 3 pins! Try it. Everyone need an extra pocket.

pocket5

And for a closer look at my signature tool aprons, check out my ETSY shop.

Girl Scout Fun All Over Again–What to do with Your Vintage Patches


badges1

Talk about Girl Power!

I remember working hard to earn these badges, then proudly hand-sewing them to the green sash so I could wear it to school.

And it felt good all over again when I pulled my vintage scout patches out of storage and started creating new designs with them a few weeks ago,

badges2

Here are my “Good Scout Wristlets”.  They combine vintage Pendleton Wool (a lucky find in just the right color), reclaimed zippers, brown bark cloth and  scout badges, of course.

A few construction notes:

Yes, I washed the wool.  It was musty  smelling so I threw it in my front loader and dryer.  It didn’t felt.  Not enough water for that.

badges3

I’m using interfacing to give the bag body.  Apply it before the zipper.  I like to hold the interfacing in place with my quilters spray, then catch the interfacing in the seam.  I use applique scissors to trim the excess right down to the stitching.

badges5

And these bags are fully lined.  I apply the lining pieces to the zipper seam before stitching the sides and bottom.  The rest of the process it pretty intuitive.  Just leave an opening  to turn the bag to the right side.   Hand stitch it closed to finish.

No more hiding those childhood accomplishments in the attic!   Old scout patches are COOL and should be used.  How are you using yours?badges4

PS. These Good Scout Wristlets aren’t in my Etsy shop yet.  But I plan to have a few for sale at the Western Wake Farmers Market with this Saturday morning (10/17).  Stop by my tent and check them out.

 

Transform Those Unflattering Tee Shirts


It’s unfair.  So  many tee shirts that remind us of good times, make us look like this–

A Bonnaroo staff shirt–BEFORE

Blame unisex styling.  Most tees are really cut  for men and  make women look ultra frumpy.

The solution–bring those unflattering shirts to the Scrap Exchange in Durham  for a tee shirt transformation workshop, Thursday August 9th from 6:30-8:30 pm.  

I’ll teach you how it easy it is to alter a tee, like this one that  pal Melissa and remade in under an hour with just 4  seams. 

Same size Bonnaroo staff shirt AFTER

More flattering fit?  You bet. 

The workshop includes access to the Scrap’s  hot letter press and Bedazzler if you want to do a little visual alteration to your shirt as well. 

Sewing machines will be provided and since tee shirts are easy to work with, this is a great class for beginning seamstresses.  Here’s the link to sign up for Tee Shirt Transformations.

%d bloggers like this: